From Saddles to Cyberspace: Fort Meade sites, roads honor patriots

100 Years of Fort Meade

Ernie Pyle Street was named after a Pulitzer Prize-winning World War II journalist. (File photo)

By The Fort Meade Museum

Many buildings and roads on post have been named to honor Army Soldiers.

They include:

Abrams Hall (2793 Hawkins Road), named after Gen. Creighton Abrams, former Army chief of staff, 1972-1974

Brett Hall (4707 Ruffner Road), named after Medal of Honor recipient 2nd Lt. Lloyd M. Brett, the American Indian Wars

DeKalb U.S. Army Reserve Center (1251 Annapolis Road), named after Maj. Gen. Baron DeKalb, military hero of the Revolutionary War

Hale Hall (4554 Llewellyn Ave.), named after Revolutionary War hero Capt. Nathan Hale

Heard Hall (4709 Ruffner Road), named after Medal of Honor recipient 1st Lt. John Heard, whose leadership successfully reversed the charge of nearly 1,000 enemy forces during the Spanish-American War

Hodges Hall (4551 Llewellyn Ave.), named after Maj. Gen. Courtney Hodges, First Army commander in the European Theater of Operations, World War II

Kuhn Hall (4415 Llewellyn Ave.), named after Maj. Gen. Joseph Kuhn, 79th Infantry Division, and first post commander of Camp Meade

MacArthur Middle School (Rockenbach Road), named after Gen. Douglas MacArthur, World War I, World War II and the Korean War

Pershing Hall (4550 Parade Field Lane), named after General of the Armies John J. “Blackjack” Pershing, commander of the Allied Expeditionary Forces, World War I. Pershing was also the first commander of First U.S. Army.

Pulaski Hall (4216 Roberts Ave.), named after Gen. Casimir Pulaski, Gen. George Washington’s aide-de-camp

Quick Hall (9804 Love Road), named after Medal of Honor recipient Sgt. Maj. John Quick, U.S. Marine Corps, Spanish-American War

Smallwood Hall (4650 Griffin Ave.), named after Maj. Gen. William Smallwood, Revolutionary War military hero

Argonne Hills Chapel, named after World War I battle/campaign area in France

Burba Park, named after Gen. Edwin Burba, First U.S. Army commander, 1968-1970

Ernie Pyle Street, named after Pulitzer Prize-winning World War II journalist

Llewellyn Avenue, named after 1st Lt. Robert C. Llewellyn, killed in action in France during World War I

Mapes Road, named after Sgt. Marvin E. Mapes, killed in action during World War I

McGlachlin Parade Field, named after Maj. Gen. Edward McGlachlin, commander, 7th Infantry Division during World War I

Reece Road, named after Sgt. Sam Reece, killed in action during World War II

Roberts Avenue, named after Cpl. Harold Roberts, Medal of Honor recipient, killed in action during World War I in France

Rock Avenue, named after 2nd Lt. William C. Rock, Distinguished Service Cross recipient, killed in action during World War II

Rockenbach Road, named after Brig. Gen. Samuel Rockenbach, who helped develop tank warfare. The Army Tank School was originally located at Fort Meade after World War I.

Zimborski Avenue, named after Cpl. Albert J. Zimborski, Distinguished Service Cross recipient, killed in action during World War II

For more information, visit http://www.ftmeade.army.mil/museum/history/history.html.

MAST FROM THE PAST:
According to an article in the Jan. 6, 1918 edition of the New York Times, Trench and Camp newspapers were published by the National War Work Council of the YMCA in partnership with various city newspapers. At Camp Meade, the partner newspaper was The Evening Star of Washington, D.C. Each of the 32 cantonments across the country had their own papers with about half of the material and editorial support from a central New York City office and the rest of the content supplied by local civilian reporters. Soldiers also contributed in the form of stories, poetry, jokes and personal columns of their experiences. Trench and Camp was meant to entertain, bring news from and to home and serve as a channel of communication to the troops from the President, Congress and the War Department.

 

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